Orthognathic Surgery

Introduction

Orthognathic surgery involves the surgical repositioning of the jaws. This surgery is usually performed in conjunction with an orthodontic treatment plan or for people suffering from sleep apnoea. The surgery involves the separation of the tooth bearing segments of the jaws from their underlying bony supports, and the selective repositioning and fixation of these segments, usually with plates and screws hidden under the soft tissues.

Indications for orthognathic surgery

The majority of people who undergo orthognathic surgery do so as part of a combined orthodontic and surgical team approach. These people often have an underlying jaw misalignment which orthodontics alone cannot treat. This may include people with large upper or lower jaws relative to the other jaw, people with large or deficient chins, and people who have a significant facial asymmetry.

Another major indication for orthognathic surgery is the surgical management of obstructive sleep apnoea. These patients will almost always be managed in conjunction with their sleep physician.

What does the surgery involve?

The surgery involves the separation of the tooth bearing segments of the jaws from their underlying bony supports, and the selective repositioning and fixation of these segments, usually with plates and screws hidden under the soft tissues. This is performed under general anaesthesia and requires hospitalisation for a period afterwards.

What are the risks of surgery?

When you consult with Dr Hyam he will discuss the relative risks and benefits of any proposed procedures. Every procedure has risks and these risks are always balanced against your individual needs and treatment requirements.